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[email protected] needs no introduction. She has became one of the most powerful philanthropists in the world by using her money intentionally and with purpose. Here's how she did it. 👇 https://t.co/uYgY5xWNhJ

The @ProfileRead's most popular deep-dive is the one featuring Charlie Munger, the master of mental models. Here are 8 lessons I've learned from his life & career. 👇 https://t.co/3rOoLOQ4IL

"We all live for freedom. We all live for someone to take our opinion seriously. "We all live for the idea that we should be able to achieve our dreams and the things we want to do in our life." — @WearAtoms co-founder @sidraqasim https://t.co/YBxei02ewu

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From Pakistan to Silicon Valley: Sidra Qasim's Unlikely Journey to Building a Shoe Empire - The Profile

Growing up in Okara, Pakistan, Sidra Qasim had greater ambitions than what society had planned for her.

She had bold ideas and audacious goals, but society wanted her to get married and start a family. She questioned the egregious gender inequality, but society wanted to quiet her voice. She was passionate about starting a business, but society wanted her to stop wasting her time.

"My mom wanted to protect me so she was standing by society, not by my side," Qasim told The Profile. "To be honest, I had no image of 'society.' It was just a word. When she was saying, 'Hey, society will say this,' I wanted to know who these people were and why I should care about them."

As she grew up, Qasim began to understand that there would be biases, judgements, and taboos that would come with all that she wanted to accomplish. Even though she understood, she refused to passively comply with a system designed to keep her trapped.

When she was a teenager, Qasim serendipitously met Waqas Ali while visiting her aunt's home. He had lived in a nearby village, but he was equally curious. More importantly, he respected and listened to Qasim's many ideas.

"I felt that I found someone who I could talk to and someone who understood what I was saying," she says. "I realized that society could be different — that men could be different. For me, Waqas was a screen I could project myself on to."

Unbeknownst to them at the time, Qasim and Ali would become partners — in business and in life. They would start one company, then another, then another. They would even get a chance to leave Pakistan for the first time and travel to the United States to pitch their idea at prestigious startup accelerator Y Combinator. They did all of this with two tools at their disposal — their brains and the internet.

The first time Qasim learned about the internet was in 2006. She overheard a conversation in which her uncle explained this innovation to her mother. He said he had heard that people could order chai directly through the internet.

"I imagined chai coming from the wires because I just couldn't imagine how it was possible to order chai from the computer," Qasim says. "Fast forward 15 years, I'm selling shoes on the internet. This is crazy."

"Selling shoes on the internet" is an understatement. Qasim and Ali co-founded Atoms , a sleek direct-to-consumer shoe startup, that has raised more than $8 million in funding from investors including Alexis Ohanian's Initialized Capital, Shrug Capital, and Kleiner Perkins.

"One time my father looked at me and my younger brother because we both had poor grades, and he said, 'You are not going to do anything in your life,'" Qasim recalls. "I said, 'Abu, one day, people will recognize you because of my name.'"

I interviewed Qasim about her mind-blowing journey to entrepreneurship. It details how she designed the life she wanted to live, how refused to give up time and time again, and why, after all these years of struggle, it's all been worth it.

Below is an excerpt of the interview, but I encourage you to watch the full interview here:

When you got accepted into Y Combinator, did you feel relief or did you feel pressure?

QASIM: A lot of pressure. I don't know if I have ever felt relief in my life, because it's always one thing after another. So Y Combinator brought a lot of pressure. There was excitement around, 'Oh we're going to the US, so maybe we'll meet some interesting entrepreneurs' because we were always reading about Silicon Valley and how someone started with a small idea and turned it into a big company, so there was that excitement. But when we came here, the big pressure was the language. Waqas and I were not speaking English in Pakistan, so speaking it was very, very difficult.

There was a lot of passion, but when we had to translate that passion into words, we were focused more on our grammar than our message. That was very hard, and it shook our confidence. We got into a frame of mind where we started believing our own doubts. There were technology companies at YC, and we were selling handmade leather shoes. It was a huge difference.

The second part was the culture. I think it took us a lot of time to adapt to the culture. And when I say culture, it's not just how you wear clothes. Culture is more of a mindset. It took us some time to understand that, but we worked on it very intentionally for the next two to four years when we started Atoms.

You went from looking up to Americans to having Americans look up to you. How did you learn to navigate that shift in power?

It feels great. When I shared my story on Humans of New York , I read it several times. I was a bit nervous but not as emotional when Brandon [Stanton] shared the first part of the story. Then, I started reading the story and the comments together, and it was very emotional.

At one point, I realized our God is the same. We all live for freedom. We all live for someone to take our opinion seriously. We all live for the idea that we should be able to achieve our dreams and the things we want to do in our life. So I think a lot of people were able to associate my story with their story no matter where they live — no matter if they're in Pakistan or in the U.S.

That was very powerful for me to see as well because for the first time, I didn't see myself as a Pakistani woman entrepreneur but I saw myself as part of the human race. It's a completely different feeling where you feel it doesn't matter the color of your skin, it doesn't matter who you are — it just matters that as a human, you are the same at your core.

In the HONY story, you said that the more success you had, the more you had "a fear of falling backwards, all the way back to my home." How often does that fear flare up?

I am still navigating through that, to be honest. How often it comes? Every time a big moment comes. Whenever some big thing happens in my life, something bad also happens at the same time with the same momentum or intensity. Then, my mind goes in a neutral state.

For example, when the Kickstarter campaign happened, it was a big moment for me, but I was not receiving any personal support from my family. There were a lot of emotions going on because there was no one to celebrate my success with in my family, so that neutralized the whole effect. I couldn't celebrate that moment.

The interesting thing is that when you've actually gone through so many experiences in your life — good or bad — you definitely pay a price, but at the same time, you also become more courageous. You also build a different type of strength within you. So at this point in my life, I also have a different type of strength within me . I'm feeling a lot of power inside me because I was able to bring a shift in my family, which I'm super proud of and this was a big goal in my life.

I'd like to pay more attention of what's going inside me, too. It's kind of like being drawn down into the sea, and you're trying to go up. You are discovering interesting things about what's going on in that beautiful sea, but at the same time, you also need to take a breath.

I definitely have a lot of doubts, but I'm learning how to use my fears as my strengths. I'm learning how not to let something pull me off the ground which I have built with such hard work and such passion.

… For more like this, make sure to sign up for The Profile here:

Want more? Check out these great reads:

Brandon Stanton, the Photographer Who Captures Our Humanity 'Atomic Habits' Author James Clear: 'I'm Never Far From a Good Idea' Noah Galloway on Combating Depression, Building Mental Resilience, and Starting Over The Science Behind Why Social Isolation Can Make You Lonely How to Improve Your Content Diet in 2021 How the Language You Speak Influences Your Mental Frameworks 100 Couples Share Their Secrets to a Successful Relationship How to Be Happy In a World Designed to Depress You 11 Practical Pieces of Advice I'd Give My Younger Self 20 Business Power Players Share Their All-Time Favorite Reads 7 Question With Square Co-Founder Jim McKelvey How the World’s Most Creative People Bring Their Ideas to Life How You Can Use "Hanlon’s Razor" to Avoid Petty Arguments 3 Ways to Attract More Luck Into Your Life I quit my job at the start of the pandemic to launch a company. Here’s what I’ve learned in the first 90 days.

Meet the relentless entrepreneur who left her small town in Pakistan to follow her entrepreneurial dreams to America.

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about 1 year ago

Today's @ProfileRead Dossier features @TomBrady, who is considered the greatest quarterback of all time. "You wanna know which ring is my favorite? The next one." Let's take a closer look at Brady's life & career in the NFL 👇👇👇 https://t.co/U9M15NXCqU

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Three-Time Olympian Kara Lynn Joyce On Why Action Is the Antidote to Doubt | Listen Notes

Kara Lynn Joyce is a three-time Olympian-turned-entrepreneur. In this conversation, Joyce explains that self-confidence and mental resilience are the keys to succeeding in sports, business, and life. Here's how she was able to pair her Olympic experience with the adrenaline-filled journey of starting a company.

-- Stay up to date by singing up for The Profile, our weekly newsletter that brings you the best profiles of successful people and companies. Sign up here: https://readtheprofile.com

00:57:17 - Kara Lynn Joyce is a three-time Olympian-turned-entrepreneur. In this conversation, Joyce explains that self-confidence and mental resilience are th…

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Veteran Noah Galloway on Combating Depression, Building Mental Resilience, and Starting Over | Listen Notes

Noah Galloway was three months into his second deployment in Iraq when his vehicle ran over a tripwire that detonated a roadside bomb. He lost his left arm, left leg, and entire military career. Here's how Galloway turned his mindset — and life — around.

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01:01:03 - Noah Galloway was three months into his second deployment in Iraq when his vehicle ran over a tripwire that detonated a roadside bomb. He lost his l…

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Inside the Mind of Humans of New York Creator Brandon Stanton | Listen Notes

Humans of New York has touched millions of readers over the years and turned into one of the best places on the internet.

HONY creator Brandon Stanton sat down for an hour-long interview with The Profile, in which he explains how he develops intimacy with strangers, why his conversations are so transformative, and why it's natural for us to empathize with other people's pain.

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00:56:14 - Humans of New York has touched millions of readers over the years and turned into one of the best places on the internet. HONY creator Brandon Stant…

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about 1 year ago
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7 Mentally Tough People on the Tactics They Use to Build Resilience | Listen Notes

Lauren Johnson is a mental performance coach who most recently worked with the New York Yankees, where she helped develop strategies for athletes and sports professionals to help them cultivate mental resilience. In this conversation, Lauren and I deconstruct the strategies and tactics of 7 mentally tough people and how they learned to perform under pressure.

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01:25:14 - Lauren Johnson is a mental performance coach who most recently worked with the New York Yankees, where she helped develop strategies for athletes an…

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Meet Rickey Gates, the Man Who Ran 3,700 Miles Across America | Listen Notes

Rickey Gates is a writer and adventurer who traversed the width of America in 2017 — from South Carolina to San Francisco. He ran a total of 3,700 miles through trails, roads, rivers, and snowy mountains. His journey painted a portrait of America, one that captures the spirit of the country and makes us realize we're not as divided as we think.

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00:52:39 - Rickey Gates is a writer and adventurer who traversed the width of America in 2017 — from South Carolina to San Francisco. He ran a total of 3,…

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Four-Time Obstacle Race Champion Amelia Boone on Mastering the Art of Suffering | Listen Notes

Dubbed “The Queen of Pain,” Amelia Boone is a corporate attorney at Apple by day and an obstacle endurance racer by night. She signed up for her first Tough Mudder race at age 28 when she realized she couldn’t do a single pull-up. Since that day, she became obsessed with getting stronger and went on to become a 4-time world champion and one of the most decorated obstacle racers in history — all while working full-time at Apple.

Here's how Boone learned to conquer the mental aspect of racing, how she confronted a years-long challenge with an eating disorder, and why she believes that your profession doesn't have to be your passion.

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00:52:36 - Dubbed “The Queen of Pain,” Amelia Boone is a corporate attorney at Apple by day and an obstacle endurance racer by night. She signed up for he…

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How 'Humans of New York' Captures the Powerful Stories of Ordinary People

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How Brandon Stanton Created 'Humans of New York' - YouTube

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'Humans of New York' Creator Brandon Stanton Shares the Secrets of His Craft | FULL INTERVIEW

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The Danger of Idolizing Imperfect Humans - The Profile

Be careful what you believe.

We've become a society with wandering eyes. We idolize, worship, and envy relationships, careers, and lives of people we've never even met. And then we clutch our pearls in horror when we find out that Bill and Melinda Gates are filing for divorce or that Jeff Bezos has been sending "below-the-belt" selfies to, well, anyone.

In school, we were taught to suspend disbelief when reading works of fiction. We were urged to become immersed in the narrative and get emotionally invested in the characters even though we knew the story wasn't true. Now, we're doing it in real life. You don't know Bill and Melinda, and you certainly don't (nor would you want to) know what Bezos does after dark.

I've been thinking about this since someone recently told me, "I feel like I know you, but I don't actually know you." They meant that after reading The Profile for years and seeing some of my tweets, they had an idea of the real me. Of course, they were seeing the version I wanted them to see. They didn't see the days where I was mourning the loss of a loved one, having a private conversation with my husband, or spending 17 hours in bed as I recovered from COVID.

To you, dear reader, I am words on a page that reliably appear in your inbox every Sunday morning. You've suspended belief to allow me to exist in your life.

My point is this: There's a certain performative nature to all of us. In a society that expects transparency and over-sharing, we end up seemingly showing our "true nature" that is completely disassociated from reality. Author Tara Westover says that for most people, “sharing themselves” online means carefully curating an identity that exaggerates some qualities while repressing others that they consider to be undesirable.

"Online, no one has acne or dark circles or a temper; no one washes dishes, does laundry or scrubs toilets," Westover says. "Mostly, we brunch. And we take exotic, rarified vacations. We pet sea turtles. We throw ourselves from airplanes." Online, we repress our ignorance, and therefore, we deny ourselves the capacity to learn. We repress our faults, and we deny our capacity to change.

I know what you're thinking: "Polina, you share profiles of successful people all the time. Aren't you just helping propagate this culture of worshipping success?"

This is not what I ever want The Profile to be. This is why I strive to highlight the good and the bad. After studying and interviewing so many people, I'm not enamored by any of them. It's because I understand that success doesn't exist in a vacuum — people are dealing with family drama, money problems, insecurities — all sorts of human messiness on a daily basis.

It would behoove us to understand that there's a difference between learning and idolizing. Take world chess champion Mangus Carlsen as an example. Carlsen was only 13 years old when he became a grandmaster, so interviewers loved to ask him about his idols.

He explains that he's learned a lot from players including Vladimir Kramnik, Garry Kasparov, and Bobby Fischer, but he doesn't idolize a single one of them.

"It's never really been my style, according to my philosophy, to idolize players, to try to copy them. I just try to learn and get the best from the great masters, contemporary and from the past," he says. In other words, learning allowed him to understand his strengths and the weaknesses while forming his own original style.

In a 1983 ABC News interview , Al Pacino is asked: "What is acting?" He looks at the interviewer in the eyes and says: "It's what we're doing right now. That's acting." Even off screen, he was performing.

Because of Pacino's illustrious career, he is considered one of the most iconic actors that's ever lived — yet he had a pretty tumultuous personal life.

At age 81, Pacino has three children but he's never been married, a choice that likely stems from his early experience with his own parents, who divorced when he was only two years old. Pacino is self-aware enough to know that he's given up certain things along the way in order to fulfill his goals of excelling in his professional life. "The actor becomes an emotional athlete," he says. "The process is painful — my personal life suffers."

Remember, if you could follow in the exact footsteps of someone who has achieved the upper echelons of success in your field, would you? Ask yourself: Am I willing to make the same sacrifices, the same missteps, and the same trade-offs? Remember that with the good also comes the bad.

Idolizing forces you into blindly worshipping imperfect humans. Learning, on the other hand, allows you to observe, synthesize, and pave your own imperfect path.

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We idolize, worship, and envy relationships, careers, and lives of people we've never even met.

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about 1 year ago
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The Profile: The quiet VC who had a monster year

Good morning, friends!

Jeff Immelt's first day as CEO at General Electric was on Sept. 10, 2001. The next day, the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon shook the world, the financial markets, and GE's business. The airplanes, one of them powered by GE engines, crashed into the WTC towers, which were insured by GE Capital.

At the ti…

Ex-GE CEO Jeff Immelt discusses the importance of taking personal responsibility.

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about 1 year ago
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The Profile Dossier: Esther Wojcicki, the Educator Who Raised Entrepreneurial Children - The Profile

Often referred to as "Silicon Valley's godmother," Esther Wojcicki is the matriarch of one of the most well-known families in the Valley.

Wojcicki, a long-time educator, is the mother of Susan, Anne, and Janet Wojcicki. In raising her kids, she created her own approach to parenting as a result of her own harsh upbringing, which was quite different from t…

“A single word or sentence can build a child up or shatter his confidence.”

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Ex-GE CEO Jeff Immelt on Leading Through Crisis, Taking Personal Responsibility, and Becoming a Master of Chaos - The Profile

Jeff Immelt's first day as CEO at General Electric was on Sept. 10, 2001. The next day, the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon shook the world, the financial markets, and GE's business. The airplanes, one of them powered by GE engines, crashed into the WTC towers, which were insured by GE Capital.

At the time, GE was heavily invested in commercial aviation, insurance, and media — all three of which were rocked by Sept. 11.

"It was the first terrorist event I had ever seen — that most Americans of my generation had ever seen," Immelt told The Profile. "I think what you learn in a crisis is that good leaders absorb fear. They're not accelerators of fear — they know how to manage a sense of calm while still being really clear about the challenges ahead."

And unbeknownst to Immelt at the time, the challenges ahead were many. The terrorist attacks would be the first of a number crises that Immelt had to grapple with in his time as CEO. He was at the helm of the company through the bursting of the dot com bubble, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, the fall of Enron, and the 2008-09 financial crisis.

"You learn to hold two truths," Immelt says. "You learn to say, 'Things can always get worse, but here's a dream that I have for the future, and I'm not going to give up on that.' You learn how to make decisions even when you don't know all the facts. In a crisis, you just got to make decisions."

Unfortunately, many of the decisions that Immelt made in his 16 years at the helm of GE did not pan out in his favor nor were they particularly popular. At one point during his tenure, he characterized his role as CEO in this way: "I feel like I want to vomit all the time."

"I never felt sorry for myself, but it was just the pressure and the consequences of all the decisions, how little was known," he says. "That period of time — it was just relentless."

Immelt succeeded Jack Welch, who was largely considered to be one of the best CEOs in the history of business. He had led GE through two decades of extraordinary corporate prosperity, so when he named Immelt as his successor, the pressure to perform was immense.

Even though Welch was no longer CEO, his legacy loomed. He was regarded by many as the greatest leader of his era by people both inside and outside the company.

During the summer of 2001, Immelt went on a golf trip with his friends before it was publicly announced he was CEO. In the locker room, a member asked him what he did for work, and he simply said, "I work at GE." The man looked at him and said, "GE, huh? I feel sorry for the poor son of a bitch who's taking Jack Welch's place."

Shareholders blamed Immelt for his inability to turn the company around and for allowing GE to lose $150 billion of market value under his watch. In his new book, Hot Seat: What I Learned Leading a Great American Company , Immelt doesn't make excuses: He takes responsibility for his missteps and lists the thorniest mistakes he regrets making in his time as CEO. They include failing to generate more shareholder value from GE Capital, missing an opportunity to reset the company in the early 2000s, and not developing a deep enough bench of rising leaders.

"It's a complicated story, and I didn't want to seem defensive, so I wanted to let the reader be the judge," he says. "I thought it was important for people to see the totality. That's why I decided to write the book."

In this conversation, Immelt shares what he's learned about leading in crisis, how he's taken responsibility for the consequences of his decisions, and why he believes the next generation of founders and CEOs need to be masters of chaos.

(Below is an excerpt of the interview, but I encourage you to listen and watch to the full interview here)

Just to paint the picture here: Your predecessor Jack Welch was largely considered to be the best CEO in history.

IMMELT: Fortune magazine had named him the best manager of the previous century in the year 2000. That's a pretty tough act to follow, but he was just very well known. He was a celebrity CEO — kind of like Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos all wrapped up into one. He had done a good job, and he'd done it for a long time. He was very charismatic, and so that was a pretty daunting task. That was the person whose shoes I was stepping into. That was my task in 2001.

When you were offered the job as CEO, did you ever think, "Those are really big shoes to fill. Maybe I'm not the right person for this?"

You know, I was a realist. There was no way not to think that his image would cast a shadow. That's just real world. But I never really wanted to be him. I was a very different person, and I felt like that the job that the company needed was going to be different, and you have to make a choice of how much to honor the past versus how much to push forward.

So when I was at GE, I was never critical of him over really 16 years, but I always wanted to do things my way and work on things I felt like were gaps inside the company. You just have to be really comfortable with that judgement without dwelling on it for too long.

I was in Tokyo in 2014, and I was being interviewed in front of 2,000 people by the Nikkei press. We were in the green room, and the person interviewing me says, "What was it like following Jack Welch?” And I was like, "I've been asked that question in 100 languages, 30,000 times over the last few years." We kind of laughed about it, so we go out on stage, and the first question was, "What was it like following Jack Welch?" So you just get used to making it part of your repertoire even though I never really carried it as a burden in terms of what I thought was important to the company.

What was your relationship to Welch when you became CEO?

I had immense respect for Jack, but when someone's that powerful inside the company, it's hard to have a mentorship relationship. I had other mentors, but not him. We had about 8 months of overlap where I got a chance to ask him a ton of questions, and he was very helpful then. And then I think over the first four or five years, we had a good relationship, but I think the financial crisis kind of changed the nature of our relationship and made it a little more difficult.

Even through the arc of my career, every tough problem I ever encountered, I would ask his opinion — even when I didn't really like him that much or when he didn't really like me that much. I would always ask him for his opinion because he had great judgement, and he knew the company. We both cared about the company in different ways.

From the outside, things looked great. Under Welch, GE had been the most valuable company on earth for a period of time. Can you discuss the reality of the business that you inherited?

The business model was kind of an old line industrial company that generated a lot of cash. That cash would go to a financial service company. We had a 50% stale industrial company, and 50% financial.

The perception didn't quite match reality. We understood that as we were taking over, and I had conversations with the board. And that's what we said about re-investing in the industrial company to try and rejuvenate the business while still growing financial services. That's the decision we made. That's one of the challenges that every leader runs into — it's how do you match perception with reality?

Looking back now, do you wish you had been more clear and transparent about the reality of the business at the time?

There was a window of time after 9/11 when I think people after a crisis have a chance to reset their companies and their narrative. There was probably a window at that time when I had a chance to kind of reset: lower earnings, less financial services, and a really clear path of how much our industrial businesses needed to be invested in in order to get them positioned for the 21st century.

It's a long-winded way to answer your question, but the answer is yes. There was a window. I do look back on that as something I wish I had done.

The 2008 financial crisis shook GE to the core. You had missed your earning numbers 3 weeks after you promised to hit them. And then Welch went on CNBC, where he said that if you missed earnings again, he would "be shocked beyond belief, and get a gun out and shoot you." What was your reaction in that moment and how did you handle that?

Yeah, I was really hurt because in 2008, I had very carefully never looked backwards or pointed a finger at him. It doesn't matter who you are or what you're doing, there's like five moments in your life when you just need a friend. You screwed up, you know you screwed up, and you need somebody to give you their hand and not smack your butt. And he chose to smack my butt, not give me his hand — and you remember that.

I never thought it would be a good thing for the company to see us bickering in public, so I never did that, but we had a very direct, private conversation. It was a line of demarcation in our relationship for sure. Even after that, when I had a really tough decision to make, I always called him — even when we weren't friends. I thought he had a good perspective that I could learn from and listen to.

Let's be clear — I knew I goofed up. I knew that, but I was trying to recover, and I needed a friend. I just needed a hand. And what he did was just the opposite of that. He made a two- to three-day story become a one-month story. It was unnecessary roughness.

In your time as CEO, it was crisis after crisis after crisis and a lot of turbulence in your professional life. How did you manage to have a solid personal life?

I've always been good at compartmentalizing. I've always been good at focusing on staying in the moment to focusing on what needs to happen and trying to separate that from other things that I'm working on.

The fact of the matter is that I have a really great wife and a great daughter. And they were always really unaffected by what I was doing. Clearly, they read things and heard things, but they were always into the person and not the businessperson. That was a blessing.

There were days when hundreds of thousands of people hated me, but one person loved me, and that was enough to keep persevering into the future.

Shares plunged nearly 30% since you took over the company. How do you respond to the people and the shareholders who feel genuinely angry at you for the decisions you made as CEO?

Look, the share price is important. It was $38 when I started as CEO, and it was $30 when I left. I understand that. I completely understand that, and I don't run from that.

What I try to point out is that we generated almost $300 billion of cash and earnings over those 16 years. We had great businesses. We generated good leaders. In other words, the team really worked hard through different crises and did their best. That's the best I can offer — a more complete story of what happened.

In the book, you have a section in which you list several of the thorniest mistakes you believe you made during your time at GE. Can you share the one mistake you regret the most?

We had good leaders, many of which are CEOs of companies today, but we ran the company for efficiency. We had eight big P&Ls. Having lived in Silicon Valley for a period of time, what I would've done differently is run the company with 100 P&Ls to give leaders more focus, accountability, and to make them more innovative earlier on.

A question from a Profile reader: "Although Jeff takes public responsibility for the overall volatility during his tenure at GE, if given the chance to do it over, what 3 things would he have done differently?"

I would've simplified the company even further, faster. I would've shed more businesses and doubled down. I would've made the company deeper. I would've actually driven the digital initiative even harder. I would've been even more determined and more dogmatic on that regard.

In this uncertain world we live in, you advise a lot of young founders in your capacity as a venture partner at NEA. How do you advise them to learn to become masters of chaos?

There's this notion of holding two truths at the same time. Knowing that the world is unfair, that it's really tough, and that just when you think things can't get worse, they can. You also need to keep your head up and know that the best opportunities may come your way during COVID, or after 9/11, or during the financial crisis. What every young leader can do is understand that you can hold two truths at the same time. You must hold two truths at the same time. But only a select few can do that.

… For more like this, make sure to sign up for The Profile here:

"What every young leader can do is understand that you can hold two truths at the same time."

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Whether you're an artist, an actor, a lawyer, a doctor, a writer, or an engineer, there is one skill you need to be successful at your profession: Creativity.

After researching the lives and careers of hundreds of innovators across industries, I’ve learned a number of practical strategies you can apply to your own work.

Here are nine techniques that will …

Check out this advice from Stephen King, Shonda Rhimes, Ed Catmull, and more.

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