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RIP Jordan Peterson - Red Scare (podcast) | Listen Notes

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The ladies pay their respects to literary titan Philip Roth and pop psychologist Jordan Peterson with Naomi Fry of the New Yorker.
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Disclaimer : The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Red Scare, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

00:44:59 - The ladies pay their respects to literary titan Philip Roth and pop psychologist Jordan Peterson with Naomi Fry of the New Yorker.

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RIP Tony - Red Scare (podcast) | Listen Notes

The ladies tackle the difficult topic of suicide in the wake of Anthony Bourdain’s death. *This episode was recorded early due to scheduling. Keep in mind that things may have changed by the time you hear it. Support Red Scare here: www.patreon.com/RedScare And don't forget we still have highly work appropriate t-shirts for patrons joining the at the $35 tier. <3 <3 <3

00:43:30 - The ladies tackle the difficult topic of suicide in the wake of Anthony Bourdain’s death. *This episode was recorded early due to scheduling. Keep i…

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about 1 year ago
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#MeThree - Red Scare Podcast - Listen Notes

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In the first part of an ongoing series, the ladies explore the state and stakes of the #MeToo movement.

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Disclaimer : The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Red Scare, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

00:47:54 - In the first part of an ongoing series, the ladies explore the state and stakes of the #MeToo movement.

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about 1 year ago
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Remembering Alex King – Matt Mullenweg

Remembering Alex King

Alex speaking at WordCamp SF 2009
One of the original WordPress developers, Alex King, has passed from cancer at far too young an age. Alex actually got involved with b2 in 2002 and was active in the forums and the “hacks” community there.

Alex had a background as a designer before he learned development, and I think that really came through as he was one of those rare people who thought about the design and usability of his code, the opposite of most development that drifts toward entropy and complexity. One of my favorite things about Alex was how darn tasteful he was. He would think about every aspect of something he built, every place someone could click, every path they could go down, and gave a thoughtfulness to these paths that I still admire and envy today.

As an example look at his project page (essentially a category archive) for the Post Formats Admin UI , isn’t that clever and intuitive how the posts connect together, and when more time passes in the thread it’s shown as a break . It’s classic Alex: something simple and thoughtful that in hindsight is so gobsmackingly obvious you wonder why everything doesn’t work that way, but you never would have imagined it beforehand. And Alex wouldn’t just imagine it and do it for himself, he released his best work as open source, as a gift to the community and the world, over and over and over again.

Back when WordPress was getting started Alex was a celebrity of the b2 world, his hacks (plugins before plugins) were some of the coolest ones around. We had a ton of overlapping interests in web standards, photography, development, and gadgets so we frequently read and commented on each other’s blogs. I would never miss a post on his site, and that’s back when we were both doing one or more posts a day. To get a sense of Alex it’s worth exploring his blog — he was a clear thinker and therefore a clear writer. The straightforward nature Alex wrote with was something I always admired about him.

We discussed WordPress early on , Alex signed up to help with what later became the plugin directory , and his CSS competition (look at those prizes! and notice it’s all GPL) was hugely influential on the path to themes, and he officially became a contributing developer in August of 2003 .

The list of what Alex was one of the first to do in the WordPress community is long, and in hindsight seems gobsmackingly obvious, which is the sign of innovation. I smile when I think of how he moved from the Bay area to Denver before it was cool, or his love of scare quotes . Once there was something going on in WordPress and he called me to talk about it, I was so surprised, he said the number was right on my contact page (and it was) but even though it had been there for years no one had ever called it before, but that was just the type of person Alex was, always reaching out and connecting.

Adam Tow, myself, Barry Abrahamson, Alex King; Photo from Adam Tow’s post .

I’m not sure how to include this next part: I couldn’t write last night — I was too tired. After falling asleep I had one of those super vivid dreams that you can’t tell are dreams. There had been some sort of mix-up on Twitter and Alex was still alive, I visited Colorado with my sister and saw him surrounded by family at a picnic table, all the rooms were taken so they put me on a floor mattress where I slept. Tons of his friends were around and we took pictures together, he was excited about the better front camera on the 6s+. (Alex understood mobile all the way back to the Treo days.) It was all very ordinary and in a group setting, until we decided to walk alongside a small highway, past some grain silos, to meet the group at a bar. The walk was just the two of us and we talked and laughed about the big mix-up and he asked about this post, what was going to be in it. He got most excited and emphatic with the part about him being a developer with great taste, and a clear writer William Zinsser would be proud of, so I like to think that those were two things he was proud of. The overwhelming emotion I remember was joy. Waking up was disconcerting, part of me wants to believe part of Alex’s spirit was there, where another more logical part thinks my mind was just going through the denial stage of grief . Regardless I know that Alex will stay in the minds of people who knew him for many years to come.

Code that Alex wrote still runs billions of times a day across millions of websites, and long after that code evolves or gets refactored the ideas and philosophy he embedded in WordPress will continue to be part of who we are. Alex believed so deeply in open source, and was one of the few people from a design background who did. (Every time you see the share icon on the web or in Android you should think of him.) I like the idea that part of his work will continue in software for decades to come, but I’d rather have him here, thinking outside the box and challenging us to do better, to be more obvious, and work harder for our users. He never gave up.

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One of the original WordPress developers, Alex King, has passed from cancer at far too young an age. Alex actually got involved with b2 in 2002 and was active in the forums and the “hacks&#82…

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about 1 year ago
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RIP Dan, RIP Dave – Matt Mullenweg

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We’ve lost two incredible souls this week: first Dan Fredinburg in Nepal and now Dave Goldberg has unexpectedly passed. I encourage you to Google articles about their lives, like this one abo…

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about 1 year ago
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Passing of David Carr – Matt Mullenweg

Shocked and dismayed this morning on the news that David Carr passed last night after collapsing in the New York Times newsroom, where he was working into the evening. If you’re not familiar with his work or legacy, these links on Mediagazer are a good start.

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Shocked and dismayed this morning on the news that David Carr passed last night after collapsing in the New York Times newsroom, where he was working into the evening. If you’re not familiar …

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about 1 year ago

David Graeber was an inspiration to me, and an influence on my thinking. Heartbreaking that we have lost him.

about 1 year ago

RIP to Tony Hsieh, someone who paved the way for eCommerce and someone with such a kind heart. You will be missed very much. ❤️

about 1 year ago
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In Memory of Juan "Brand" Cruz, a Man Who Inspired Me to Be Better

By Leo Babauta

About 10 days ago, my wife Eva’s father Juan “Brand” Salas Cruz passed away, and he left an immense legacy.

He also changed me in ways I am only now beginning to realize.

He was a man of fierce and immense love for his family and anyone whose life he touched — and he touched a lot of lives, for many years. My father-in-law Juan was a man who was there for anyone, whether you were one of his beloved grandchildren, nephews or nieces … or a friend of his at the Guam Legislature … or a fellow rancher who was in need. He was there, always.

He was the guy who was called when someone was in trouble. The guy who made huge amounts of foods for weddings, graduation parties, funerals, birthday celebrations. The man who would fight for his loved ones, would be a second father to nieces and nephews, would do anything at all for his brothers and sisters, who poured out love for his grandchildren.

He changed me, because I saw him live that message of love every day that I knew him. He changed me, because he inspired me to be a better man. And I love him for that.

A Life of Contribution

Juan Salas Cruz was born in 1948 in Santa Rita, Guam, when the village was still newly built in the red-dirt hills of southern Guam. It was shortly after World War II, and Guam was in ruins from war, when the Japanese occupied the island until 1944.

He was born to his parents Juan Camacho and Luisa Salas Cruz, the “Brand” family, and he was one of 14 brothers and sisters. So a huge family, one that is incredibly loyal to each other.

He served in the Navy in the Vietnam War, worked at the Guam Telephone Authority, and then he met his wife, Lourdes Santos, who he loved for 40 years. They had three children together: my wife Eva, along with Amy and Juan Jr. There was nothing he wouldn’t do for these three kids.

Juan worked for many years in the Guam Legislature, as chief of staff and key administrative staffer for several Guam senators. He was the man behind the scenes for many people in the government, the problem solver, the mover of worlds.

He was also the first person in his family to get a college degree, and he had a strong intelligence that he didn’t often show off but that you could see in his eyes and actions.

But he was more than an academic: in his heart, he was a fisherman and a rancher. He loved fishing with a “talaya” (the Chamorro word for fishing net) and would take his nephews and nieces with him to remote beaches to catch fish that he loved to barbecue. He absolutely loved his ranch in Dededo (in northern Guam) and raised pigs that he would roast for people’s special occasions, along with vegetables for his delicious soups. He was often found with red dirt smeared all over his clothes and cowboy boots after a long day at the ranch, and some of his best friends were his ranch neighbors.

How I Knew Him

Some of my favorite memories of him were when I would help him cook. He had a huge outdoor kitchen with massive pots and pans that he got from Navy surplus, and it seemed like every week there was a big event he was cooking for.

I would help him make red rice (a Guam specialty), or make incredible amounts of fried rice, eggs, bacon, pancakes and more for family breakfasts on New Year. We would barbecue, smoke beef, fry fish, bake hams, roast pigs. And then after all that, we would clean those massive pots with a big spray nozzle and hose down the kitchen.

I remember helping him after a typhoon had devastated the island and we had no power or running water. He would drive his big red 4×4 truck around getting water for family members and friends, helping them fix their houses, cleaning up debris of torn-up houses and trees, getting equipment to whoever needed them.

I remember him with his grandchildren, my kids … and how they were the world to him. He threw big birthday parties for them, took them to the ranch to ride tractors and help feed the pigs, brought them donuts on random mornings just because he was thinking of them, made them their favorite dishes and desserts, was always looking for toys for them, and would kiss them as if it were the last kiss he’d ever get.

I know how much he loved his home island of Guam. There was no other place like it, and he would say, “Guam is good,” with a pride and love in his eyes. He loved the backcountry ranches but also the people in the villages, and he had friends everywhere. Everywhere. He would listen to island music (and also country music) and he talked to me about his pride in the Chamorro people.

His Love Lives On

It’s an understatement to say that he loved his brothers and sisters and their kids — including his brothers and sisters on his wife’s side, and their kids, they were no different in his eyes, all family, all deep inside his heart. Love is a tremendous word, but it’s inadequate to express how he felt. He would do anything for them, and often did.

He had nephews who were sons to him, on both sides of the family. He had nieces who were daughters to him. And their kids were his grandchildren. He raised not only his own kids but many others, and they are so broken up about the loss of this father figure in their lives. He went to any length to help them, and taught them so much about life.

He is not dead, because he lives on in their hearts, in their actions, everything they do reflecting some part of him, from how they treat each other and others in the community, to how they made a huge fiesta spread with several dozen dishes last night to honor him.

He lives on in me, my wife, my kids. In his daughter Amy, in Juan Jr. and his wife Jenny, in every relative who loved him and wants to express that love in some way. He lives on in his wife, Lourdes, who now has to go on without her partner. I’m so sorry for your loss, mom. I’m sorry for everyone’s loss, because his cowboy boots can never be filled, nor can the place he holds in our hearts.

All we can do is live by his example, and be better people, out of love for him.

By Leo Babauta About 10 days ago, my wife Eva’s father Juan “Brand” Salas Cruz passed away, and he left an immense legacy. He also changed me in ways I am only now beginning to realize. He was a man of fierce and immense love for his family and anyone whose life he touched — […]

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Scott Dinsmore, I Miss You Deeply

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By Leo Babauta

Scott Dinsmore, creator of Live Your Legend , died in a freak accident on Mt. Kilimanjaro a couple days ago. He was one of my best friends in the world.

I’m still in shock — at the suddenness of his death, the senselessness of it, the incredible loss of all he had to give, but most of all, at the gaping hole that his loss leaves in my heart.

I loved (and still love) Scott deeply, and I can’t believe he is gone.

Some of you might know Scott because he delivered a massively inspiring (and popular) TED talk on finding work you love. Others of you have followed his well-known blog for years, and still others have taken his courses on connecting with people and finding your passion. And some of you might be a part of his Live Your Legend Local communities around the world (thousands of people have been touched by this movement).

I know Scott as a running partner. Someone who teased me about my faults, and who I teased about his unabashed love of Taylor Swift (who he found inspiring). I know him as someone who I drank (too much) wine with, someone who pushed me to run and finish a 50-mile ultramarathon when I wanted to quit, someone who would stop to admire the beauty of the hill we had just climbed, someone who drank tea with me as we dreamed big and inspired each other, someone who ordered too much when we went out to dinner.

He was larger than life, and yet as intimate a friend as you can get. You could count on him in so many ways, to be there when you needed him, to show up in a big way, to push you when you needed it, to make you laugh, to dance and do handstands and burpees and drink green juice.

He loved life with a passion we should all find.

Scott was always challenging himself, always on a new diet or workout challenge, always finding a bigger purpose for his business, always looking to do something huge. He would order everything on the menu and roll his eyes in pleasure. He would bite off more than he could possibly chew, and love it.

How I Met Scott

What most people don’t know is that I met Scott when he was in my blogging club, a group of bloggers I mentored for a couple of years. He had a little-known blog called Reading for Your Success, about speed reading and personal development books. We met when I moved to San Francisco and held a meetup for the blogging club, and after the meetup he gave me a three-page letter that he and Chelsea had written for me. It was a list of all their favorite spots in San Francisco, because they knew that I was new to the city and so gave me some amazing recommendations — vegetarian restaurants, places to hike and work out, places to get drinks. It was awesome.

He gave me that thoughtful letter, then invited me on a run.

We went on a run, and it changed both of our lives. It was around the Marina and Presidio, at sunset, and it was gorgeous. Breathtaking. We meant to go out for 30 minutes, and we took 3 hours, stopping to do pushups or enjoy the stunning views. We connected then over that run, and we never stopped running together.

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Scott in Paris

The last time I saw him, it was a hot evening in Paris with the sun going down. He and I had cold rosé wine with Chelsea and Eva on a cobbled Paris street, and the sun was bathing him in glory. I’ll always remember him like that, kissed by the gods.

We had just done a meetup with Zen Habits and Live Your Legend readers in a cool Paris park, and it was an amazing experience. We met so many great people, and Scott and I loved doing it together. We both wanted to do another hundred of those.

We won’t be able to do any more of them. That’s the gut-wrenching part of this for me: I won’t have any more of those Scott moments in my life, only the recollection. And Scott won’t be able to give everything he wanted to give to the world.

To Scott’s Family & Friends

I would like to say, to Chelsea, to Scott’s parents and sister and other family members, to his closest friends … I’m deeply sorry. This loss is felt most deeply by you guys, but just know that it is also felt by so many others, and our love is with you right now.

Scott was truly blessed to have Chelsea as his partner, and he knew it. He told me so many times how lucky he was, and going around the world with Chelsea this past year has been a dream come true for him. The two of them were such a gorgeous couple, so much fun, so full of love and life, so generous. I’m so sorry, Chelsea, that this has happened.

Scott talked so lovingly too of his parents, of how his dad was his closest confidant, how he wouldn’t be anywhere without his parents’ support, encouraging him to be bold and experiment. I saw them at our meetup in Paris, and I know how proud they were of him. You could see it in their eyes. Bill and Janet, I don’t know what to say, but that my heart is with you.

This Isn’t Goodbye

Scott will always be in my life. Every time I go on a run, it will be thinking of the time we ran up Twin Peaks and saw a sunset on fire. The excitement about life he showed in every phone call, every email, every time you saw him — that will be infused in my life. He sucked the juice out of life with no apologies, and that changed me.

Scott influenced tens of thousands of people, got them to connect with each other and do something inspiring and seek and create the work they love. That is truly amazing. I know when we went on our first run together, Scott had no idea that this would have happened. And when it started happening, he was blown away by it. He was touched by the stories of people around the world who changed their lives based on what he created. That floored him, daily.

I want to carry on what Scott was doing, in some way. I don’t know what that will be, but I refuse to let his work fade away. What Scott created, in all of us, will live on.

Scott, my friend … you don’t know what you’ve done for me, or how truly, truly grateful I am to have known you and called you a friend. I miss you, I miss you, I love you.

Scott in Paris

By Leo Babauta Scott Dinsmore, creator of Live Your Legend, died in a freak accident on Mt. Kilimanjaro a couple days ago. He was one of my best friends in the world. I’m still in shock — at the suddenness of his death, the senselessness of it, the incredible loss of all he had to give, […]

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about 1 year ago

Rest in Peace, Rockstar. @JBoorman we love you and we'll never forget you https://t.co/Luz16g33AB https://t.co/67WEkMdeUj

Joshua M. Brown

I’m a New York City-based financial advisor at Ritholtz Wealth Management LLC . I help people invest and manage portfolios for them. For disclosure information please see here .

Rest in peace Earl Simmons 😢

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about 1 year ago
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Testimony before the Arizona House of Representatives

I delivered this testimony before the Arizona House of Representatives today in support of HB2005, which will give all app developers the right to choose their own payment processor, as well as protection from retaliation if they do so. It was a closely contested bill, but in the end passed the committee in a 7 to 6 vote. You can read my live-tweeting thread from this morning . Madam Chair, Members of the Committee, My name is David Heinemeier Hansson, I'm a developer, and the co-owner of a Chicago-based software company. We nearly had our new email service HEY.com , which launched last summer, destroyed by Apple when we refused to pay their 30% tax . So I'm going to focus on Apple in my testimony, but the complaints apply equally in spirit to Google, and the relief proposed by HB2005 would apply to both. Apple's tax of 30% on developers is more than five times the rate of the Arizona state sales tax, and more than fifteen times the rate of other payment processing services. Apple boasts that this exorbitant tax only applies to 17% of developers, but that merely proves the tax is not universally applied. And there's nothing stopping Apple from expanding who the tax applies to or even keeping it at 30%. The guidelines that dictate who pays and who doesn't is under total control of Apple, and they've changed the rules or their interpretation many times to carve out exemptions for businesses they cut deals with or to start collecting from companies they weren't in the past. And internal deliberations, uncovered by the House Antitrust Subcommittee , show that Apple has previously considered raising the tax to 40% . Apple has an iron grip on the market, and if they say "you now have to pay", all developers can reply is "how much". The absurd thing is that Apple is already being paid hundreds of millions of dollars by developers to operate the App Store. Everyone who publishes on the platform has to pay $99/year for the privilege. And this is all huge companies like Uber, Facebook, or Google pay, because Apple either lets them use their own payment processing services or because they monetize their services through advertisement. How is it fair that billion-dollar companies that use thousands of times more of Apple's App Store infrastructure get away with paying $99/year, while a mid-sized software company making $10m/year has to pay $3m? It isn't and it doesn't. As David Cicilline, the chairman of the House Antitrust Subcommittee, has said: This is highway robbery . Apple operates a tollbooth on the only road to distribution of mobile software for the dominant iPhone platform. And this doesn't just hurt app developers, but consumers as well. When Apple tried to shake down our company for the 30% cut of revenues, they explicitly encouraged us simply to pass on the cost to consumers. And that's exactly what other developers have done. Apple is now involved in offering credit cards, producing TV shows, curating news, offering fitness classes, commissioning video games, streaming music, running digital radio stations, making heart-rate monitors, selling audio speakers and headphones, and of course manufacturing and selling computers, phones, watches, tablets, and controlling the operating system for all of the above. Oh, and apparently they're also close to getting into the car-making business - woohoo! Standard Oil would have been green with envy at how Apple has used their monopoly in one area to further their business interests in every other. This is classic tying and bundling behavior, as long recognized by antitrust laws as harmful to a fair market place. If Arizona passes this bill, it would not only provide immediate relief to Arizona developers and consumers, it would instantly make the state the most desirable place on earth to start a new software company. Not only would escaping Apple's 30% tax be a huge competitive advantage, the protection against retaliation would make for a much more predictable marketplace. That's a two-punch combo for investment: lower costs, predictable rules. Apple already has an incredible advantage over any company that dares compete with them, and soon that might well be most of the economy. Giving us at least a fighting chance by enforcing a choice in payment processing is the right thing to do. Past testimonies on the topic of monopoly app stores: Before the North Dakota Senate , Before the democratic side of the House Antitrust Subcommittee , Before the House Antitrust Subcommittee .

I delivered this testimony before the Arizona House of Representatives today in support of HB2005, which will give all app developers the right to choose their own payment processor, as well as protection from retaliation if they do so. It was a closely contested bill, but in the end passed the committee in a 7 to 6 vote. You can read ...

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Incredible story from my Papa, Dr. Abraham Pishevar, that when ran for office he gave $30 of his $50 savings to the Reagan Campaign. This was Papa’s first real outing for dinner at my friends backyard kabob bbq. Me, his grandkids and my friends all were amazed. God Bless America. https://t.co/MDLByuKmTv

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about 1 year ago
about 1 year ago

I feel like Kobe is smiling in heaven today.

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about 1 year ago
about 1 year ago

I’ve been honored to be a friend, mentee and supporter of the Palaus for many years. We rejoice his entrance to eternity and mourn his departure from us. https://t.co/MLqvwxyCIq

12 months ago

We lost a kindhearted soul today in Chadwick Boseman. Let this be a reminder to be kind to people, you never know what they are going through.

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Silicon Valley and the US-China Cold War with Jacob Helberg | Listen Notes

Ramit Sethi (@ramitsethi), founder and CEO of I Will Teach You To Be Rich, joined Ben Casnocha to discuss:- Ramit’s philosophy of personal finance. He says he focuses on $30,000 questions as opposed to $3 questions because there’s no limit on how much you can earn, but there is a limit on how much …

00:31:35 - Jacob Helberg (@jacobhelberg), senior advisor at Stanford Cyber, adjunct fellow at CSIS, and formerly of Google, joins Erik on this episode.They dis…

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Laurie Woolever Remembers Anthony Bourdain - YouTube

The window of the Apple Store in downtown San Francisco, ten years ago. People left their thoughts on post-it notes. https://t.co/dNJddb5S8I

10 months ago